Exhibit
Perverse Landscapes

Perverse Landscapes
The work of Yihyun Lim and Nathan Friedman approaches the subject of the contemporary landscape from opposite ends; one revealing a string of site specific conditions and the other constructing an adaptive terrain.  Together, their work asserts a complexity of landscape counterpoint to its passive popular image.

Yihyun Lim

Felted Terrain attempts to subvert the notion of the knitted/felted textile associated with primitive handcraft through its integration of soft electronics, its use of computational design, and its fabrication method. Inspired by the rolling, mossy landscape of Iceland, Felted Terrain translates the shapes of natural terrain through the generation of a three-dimensional, interactive textile. At the scale of the interior the knitted/felted textile no longer resonates as the familiar material of the body. Part furniture, part surface, and part sensory outlet, Felted Terrain allows users to experience the textile in an unexpected way. Exhibition support has been provided by the Department of Architecture and a Director’s Grant from the Council for the Arts at MIT.

Nathan Friedman

Mexican/American Borderlands exploits inherent tensions in the 2009 Southwest Border Initiative, a major US federal project enacted to, “effectively disrupt illegal flows of weapons and bulk cash to Mexico and to ensure that our border security remains resistant to the flow of drugs and violence.” Featuring a series of 16 digital c-prints, the work is part of ongoing research on developments in the borderland regions motivated by a contemporary militarization of the area and its effects. At a time when American nationalism has reached a heightened state, this project links past ideals with current realities – representing a region affected by the physical products of an abstract ideology. Initial funding was awarded through a Robert James Eidlitz Fellowship in 2012, which allowed for extensive travel throughout the region. Additional exhibition support has been provided by the Department of Architecture and a Director’s Grant from the Council for the Arts at MIT.