Press Clips

Our faculty, students and researchers are constantly creating and producing innovative work, which is often featured in publications and websites across the globe. Here is a selection of recent headlines.

WGBH Innovation Hub
Aug 2015

John Ochsendorf, a professor of architecture at MIT and MacArthur fellow, believes that today’s engineers and architects have a lot to learn from structures like the Pantheon. With our current focus on exponential progress and the ever-increasing pace of technological change, it might seem strange to be inspired by such retro structures. But Ochsendorf thinks that old buildings have lessons to teach us.

The Atlantic
Aug 2015

Researchers at the MIT Media Lab are developing office furniture that could, with the help of sensors, wheels, and motors, transform as the needs of workers shift throughout the day. A desk could expand to become a conference table, and walls could descend from the ceiling to create a meeting space. Furniture could sync with a calendar or with a wearable device that could tell, for instance, that an employee has been sitting for too long.

WIRED (UK)
Aug 2015

When we hold our annual two-day ideas and innovations festival WIRED2015 on October 15-16 in London, some of the strongest talks will be from the WIRED Innovation Fellows -- 12 emerging stars we've brought together from fields as diverse as music and gastronomy to engineering. (Two winners from Media Lab)

MIT News
Aug 2015

With income inequality emerging as an issue in the 2016 U.S. presidential elections, you may well begin to see references to MIT’s Living Wage Calculator (LWC). This online spreadsheet lets anyone calculate a wage required to make ends meet, adjusted for every community in the U.S. The LWC was recently updated with fresh information on a wider variety of cost of living data, making it more relevant than ever.

The Boston Globe
Aug 2015

The lamp shades on display at the Somerville studio of Nervous System look to be made of bone or even coral but are actually durable nylon. And the earrings in intricate beehive patterns were etched on paper-thin stainless steel.

They are the work of Jessica Rosenkrantz and Jesse Louis-Rosenberg, a couple who met at MIT a decade ago and create surprising jewelry and housewares using state-of-the art 3-D printers and old-school tools bought on Craigslist.

Beta Boston
Aug 2015

Researchers at the Camera Culture Group, headed by Ramesh Raskar at the MIT Media Lab, have designed the eyeSelfie, an inexpensive hand-held device for taking a photograph of the retina, the optic nerve, and the vasculature, which is located all the way at the back of one’s eye.

Photo District News (PND)
Aug 2015

Keith Ellenbogen, who specializes in dramatic, colorful underwater images of marine life, recently won a visiting artist-in-residence fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Art, Science & Technology. Starting this September and continuing through mid-January 2016, he’ll be working closely with M.I.T. physics professor Allan Adams to develop new high-speed photography techniques. “We’ll be finishing a series of projects dedicated to making underwater high-speed video in extreme situations easier,” Adams says.

Photo District News (PND)
Aug 2015

Keith Ellenbogen, who specializes in dramatic, colorful underwater images of marine life, recently won a visiting artist-in-residence fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Art, Science & Technology. Starting this September and continuing through mid-January 2016, he’ll be working closely with M.I.T. physics professor Allan Adams to develop new high-speed photography techniques. “We’ll be finishing a series of projects dedicated to making underwater high-speed video in extreme situations easier,” Adams says.

The Wall Street Journal
Aug 2015

Can India’s Kumbh Mela–a religious pilgrimage that at its peak is expected to attract around 30 million people to the western city of Nashik this year–provide ideas for Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who plans to build 100 smart cities in the country? Technology experts from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and their associates think it can.

WGBH Innovation Hub
Aug 2015

The Burj Khalifa might be the tallest building in the world, but is it the most advanced? MIT Professor John Ochsendorf thinks that today’s architects should take a page from classical structures.